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The decision to refinance your home depends on many factors, including the length of time you plan to live there, current interest rates, and how long it will take to recoup your closing costs. In some cases, refinancing is a wise decision. In others, it may not be worth it financially.

Because you already own the property, refinancing likely would be easier than securing a loan as a first-time buyer. Also, if you have owned your property or house for a long time and built up significant equity, that will make refinancing easier. However, if tapping that equity or consolidating debt is your reason for a refi, keep in mind that doing so can increase the number of years that you will owe on your mortgage—not the smartest of financial moves. 

Reasons to Refinance

So when does it make sense to refinance? The typical should-I-refinance-my-mortgage rule of thumb is that if you can reduce your current interest rate by 1% or more, it might make sense because of the money you’ll save. Refinancing to a lower interest rate also allows you to build equity in your home more quickly. If interest rates have dropped low enough, it might be possible to refinance to shorten the loan term—say, from a 30-year to a 15-year fixed-rate mortgage—without changing the monthly payment by much.

Consider How Long You Plan to Stay in Your Home

In deciding whether or not to refinance, you’ll want to calculate what your monthly savings will be when the refinance is complete. Let’s say, for example, that you have a 30-year mortgage loan for $200,000. When you first assumed the loan, your interest rate was fixed at 6.5%, and your monthly payment was $1,257. If interest rates fall to 5.5% fixed, this could reduce your monthly payment to $1,130—a savings of $127 per month, or $1,524 annually.

Your lender can calculate your total closing costs for the refinance should you decide to proceed. If your costs amount to approximately $2,300, you can divide that figure by your savings to determine your break-even point—in this case, the home for two years or longer, refinancing would make sense one-and-a-half years in the home [$2,300 ÷ $1,524 = 1.5]. If you plan to stay in the home for two years or longer, refinancing would make sense.

If you want to refinance with less than a 1% reduction, say 0.5%, the picture changes. Using the same example, your monthly payment would be reduced to $1,194, a savings of $63 per month, or $756 annually [$2,300 ÷ $756 = 3.0], so you would have to stay in the home for three years. If your closing costs were higher, say $4,000, that period would jump to nearly five-and-a-half years.

Consider Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI)

During periods when home values decline, many homes are appraised for much less than they had been appraised in the past. If this is the case when you are considering refinancing, the lower valuation of your home may mean that you now lack sufficient equity to satisfy a 20% down payment on the new mortgage.

To refinance, you will be required to provide a larger cash deposit than you had expected, or you may need to carry PMI, which will ultimately increase your monthly payment. It could mean that, even with a drop in interest rates, your real savings might not amount to much.

Conversely, a refinance that will remove your PMI would save you money and might be worth doing for that reason alone. If your house has 20% or more equity, you will not need to pay PMI unless you have an FHA mortgage loan or you are considered a high-risk borrower. If you currently pay PMI, have at least 20% equity, and your current lender will not remove the PMI, you should refinance.

Debt

This is the number 1 reason to refinance a mortgage for many homeowners!  Look at these shocking numbers across the boards:

Americans may have a love-hate relationship with their credit cards, but that’s not preventing them from piling on debt.

The country’s outstanding credit card and other types of revolving debt have jumped almost 20% from a decade ago, reaching an all-time high of about $1.1 trillion, according to a recent study from CompareCards.

The average balance on a credit card is now almost $6,200, and the typical American holds four credit cards, according to the credit bureau Experian. Credit card issuers are also giving Americans more room to run up debt, boosting the typical credit limit by 20% over the last decade to $31,000.

If this is you, this is the very reason to consolidate and get rid of this debt.  You must be proactive in the process, not reactive in the debt process.  The cycle above will never end on its own.  No job, no stimulus, no bonus will shed the average amount of debt above.  However, your home can.  Interest will go up, not down.  There is no more down.  We cannot get lower than we have been.  The window to become financially stable is open right now for you.

 

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